Red Lake Nation News - Babaamaajimowinan (Telling of news in different places)

GOODMAN THEATRE CELEBRATES INDIGENOUS ARTISTRY ON STAGE THIS SUMMER

 


**EVENTS INCLUDE WHERE WE BELONG, MOHEGAN THEATER-MAKER MADELINE SAYET’S SMASH HIT TOUR-DE-FORCE;

THE SWEETEST SEASON—A SPOKEN WORD AND SONG SHOWCASE WITH THE MITCHELL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN; AND A FREE ART EXPO—WE ARE STILL HERE—FEATURING WORK BY CHICAGO-BASED INDIGENOUS ARTISTS**

***MADELINE SAYET DISCUSSES HER SMASH HIT PRODUCTION IN THIS EXCLUSIVE NEW INTERVIEW***

(Chicago, IL) This summer, Goodman Theatre offers a celebration of Native stories with a month of Indigenous artistry on and off stage. Three events include Where We Belong, Mohegan theater-maker Madeline Sayet’s acclaimed solo piece, directed by Mei Ann Teo, in its Chicago debut (through July 24); The Sweetest Season: Indigenous Spoken Word and Song, a showcase of Indigenous performances in partnership with the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian (July 18); and We Are Still Here, an art exhibit featuring the work of Chicago-based Indigenous artists (through July 24). For tickets and more information about each of these events, including details about enhanced and accessible performances, visit GoodmanTheatre.org or call 312.443.3800.

Hailed by the Chicago Tribune in a four-star (out of four) review as “breathtakingly beautiful; a powerful one-woman performance (by) a captivating storyteller and an important voice,” Where We Belong by Madeline Sayet, directed by Mei Ann Teo, makes its Chicago premiere. An indigenous theater-maker journeys across geographic borders, personal history and cultural legacy in search of a place to belong. “Heartfelt and eye-opening” (Free Lance Star), “through anecdotes with pathos and a playful charm, (Sayet delivers a) wrenching meditation on appropriation, cultural genocide and how to best honor one’s ancestry” (The Washington Post). Goodman Theatre presents the Woolly Mammoth Theatre production in association with Folger Shakespeare Library as part of a national tour—including Philadelphia Theatre Company, Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival, Seattle Repertory Theater, The Public Theater and Folger Theatre at Folger Shakespeare Library. Where We Belong appears through July 24 in the 350-seat flexible Owen Theatre. Tickets ($15 - $45, subject to change) are available at Goodmantheatre.org/Belong or by phone at 312.443.3800.

On July 18 in a one-night-only special event, music, dance and spoken word come together in The Sweetest Season: Indigenous Spoken Word and Song—an evening of local Indigenous artistry in a program curated by Vincent Romero (Laguna Pueblo), presented by the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian. Featured artists include William Buchholtz (Musician), Sergio Ceron (Singer/Drummer); Martiza Garcia (Singer/Dancer), Mark Jourdan (Singer/Songwriter), Mark LaRoque (Storyteller/Poet), Lanialoha Lee (Choreographer/Composer), Michaela Marchi (Singer), Vince Romero (Storyteller/Curator) and Jennifer Stevens (Singer/Visual Artist). The Mitchell Museum of the American Indian is one of only a handful of museums across the country that focuses exclusively on the art, history, and culture of Native American and First Nation peoples from throughout the United States and Canada. It promotes public understanding of cultural diversity through first voice perspectives. The museum’s mission is to promote and share a deeper understanding of Native American peoples through the collection, preservation, and interpretation of their traditional and contemporary art and material culture. The Sweetest Season performance showcase takes place on July 18 at 7pm in the Owen Theatre. Tickets ($15) are available at GoodmanTheatre.org/Sweetest or by phone at 312.443.3800. (For complimentary Press Passes, email Press@GoodmanTheatre.org; media only).

In a celebration of Native and Indigenous art, theatergoers can experience a special exhibition, We Are Still Here, in the Goodman lobby featuring the work of Chicago based Indigenous artists Jim Terry, Paola Seeley and Noelle Garcia. The We Are Still Here exhibit is now open through July 24 and tickets are not required. More information about the artists is available at GoodmanTheatre.org/StillHere

ABOUT GOODMAN THEATRE

Chicago’s theater since 1925, Goodman Theatre is a not-for-profit arts and community organization in the heart of the Loop, distinguished by the excellence and scope of its artistic programming and community engagement.

Led by Artistic Director Robert Falls and Executive Director Roche Schulfer, the theater’s artistic priorities include new play development (more than 150 world or American premieres), large scale musical theater works and reimagined classics. Artists and productions have earner two Pulitzer Prizes, 22 Tony Awards and more than 160 Jeff Awards, among other accolades. The Goodman is the first theater in the world to produce all 10 plays in August Wilson’s “American Century Cycle.” Its longtime annual holiday tradition A Christmas Carol, now in its fifth decade, has created a new generation of theatergoers in Chicago. The Goodman also frequently serves as a production and program partner with national and international companies and Chicago’s Off-Loop theaters.

Using the tools of the theatrical profession, the Goodman’s Education and Engagement programs aim to develop generations of citizens who understand the cultures and stories of diverse voices. The Goodman’s Alice Rapoport Center for Education and Engagement is the home of these programs, which are offered free of charge for Chicago youth—85% of whom come from underserved communities—schools and life-long learners.

As a cultural and community organization invested in quality, diversity and community, Goodman Theatre is committed to using the art of theater for a better Chicago. Goodman Theatre’s Action Plan for Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, Anti-Racism and Access (IDEAA) was born out of the belief that progress means action, which includes building on the decades-long commitment to using art, assets and resources to contribute to a more just, equitable and anti-racist society.

Goodman Theatre was founded by William O. Goodman and his family in honor of their son Kenneth, an important figure in Chicago’s cultural renaissance in the early 1900s. The Goodman family’s legacy lives on through the continued work and dedication of Kenneth’s family, including Albert Ivar Goodman, who with his late mother, Edith-Marie Appleton, contributed the necessary funds for the creation on the new Goodman center in 2000.

Today, Goodman Theatre leadership also includes the distinguished members of the Artistic Collective: Rebecca Gilman, Dael Orlandersmith, Henry Godinez, Steve Scott, Kimberly Senior, Chuck Smith, Regina Taylor and Mary Zimmerman. Jeff Hesse is Chairman of Goodman Theatre’s Board of Trustees, Fran Del Boca is Women’s Board President and Craig McCaw is President of the Scenemakers Board for young professionals.

 

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