Red Lake Nation News - Babaamaajimowinan (Telling of news in different places)

Make a Resolution to Make a Change in Health Care

 


We all make health-related resolutions for the New Year, don’t we? Eat better, exercise more, stress less.

But for many Americans, making a change in their health care may be the 2016 resolution. Fed up with costly and intrusive government health care, thousands are switching to health sharing—a concept that allows members to share in the cost of other member’s medical bills, and in turn, have their medical costs paid for as well.

Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom (CCHF, http://www.cchfreedom.org) has long educated Americans about the alternatives to enrolling in a failing and costly government health care system. And because health-sharing members are exempt from Obamacare mandates, membership has skyrocketed.

“Health sharing can be a wonderful way to be a part of a health care community and is also a way to avoid enrolling in costly and intrusive Obamacare coverage,” said Twila Brase, co-founder and president of CCHF. “And the stories of those helped by health sharing are so uplifting—much different than the horror stories we hear about the (Un)Affordable Care Act. Health sharing can be a very inexpensive and very personal alternative to traditional health care.”

CCHF, a patient-centered national health freedom organization based in St. Paul, Minn., existing to protect health care choices, individualized patient care, and medical and genetic privacy rights, first reported on the three largest health sharing organizations nearly six years ago. At that time, says Brase, there were 42,000 members in Samaritan Ministries and 38,000 members in Medi-Share. Now, Samaritan Ministries has 165,000 members and Medi-Share has 154,000 members.

CCHF has also shared the stories of real health sharing members on its daily Health Freedom Minute radio feature (see Nov. 2-6, 2015).

Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom, a patient-centered national health freedom organization based in St. Paul, Minn., exists to protect health care choices, individualized patient care, and medical and genetic privacy rights. CCHF president and co-founder Twila Brase, R.N., has been called one of the “100 Most Powerful People in Health Care” and one of “Minnesota’s 100 Most Influential Health Care Leaders.” A public health nurse, Brase has been interviewed by CNN, Fox News, Minnesota Public Radio, NBC Nightly News, NBC’s Today Show, NPR, New York Public Radio, the Associated Press, Modern Healthcare, TIME, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and The Washington Times, among others.

 

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