Red Lake Nation News - Babaamaajimowinan (Telling of news in different places)

Articles from the November 16, 2015 edition

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Tribe holds elections on Tuesday

PEMBROKE — Lumbee tribal members get their chance to go to the polls Tuesday and elect a chairman and seven members to the 21-member Lumbee Tribal Council. Four candidates hope to unseat incumbent Chairman Paul Brooks, who has served as chairman since 2011 when he was elected in a special election to fill the remaining one-year on the three-year term of former Chairman...

 

South Dakota tribe burned pot crop for fear of federal raid

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) - A South Dakota American Indian tribe that sought to open the nation's first marijuana resort says it burned its crop after federal officials signaled a potential raid. Flandreau Santee Sioux President Anthony Reider told The Associated Press the tribe had three weeks of discussions with authorities that culminated with a meeting in Washington that...

 

Link between Navajo suicides, mine spill not clear-cut

FLAGSTAFF, ARIZ. — In testimony before Congress, letters to the federal government and news releases, Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye and his vice president have brought up recent tragedies that have shaken some reservation towns to their cores. They said eight people killed themselves in communities impacted by the unleashing of toxic waste from a Colorado gold mine...

 

The Week That Was: The Big Stories in Indian Country, November 15, 2015

Marijuana fields went up in flames, oil trains derailed, boarding schools caught Hollywood’s eye, and Tara Houska stood by Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders in Washington. All this and more grabbed headlines last week in Indian Country. UP IN SMOKE: The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribal Council voted to temporarily suspend its marijuana operation on Saturday November 8. By...

 

Disagreements Threaten Uneasy Truce Between Tribes, Maine

Eighty-one years after a neglected tribal water supply caused a devastating outbreak of typhoid fever and a century after the state outlawed spearfishing of the salmon that fed their ancestors, Native American tribes who trace their history back millennia say their trust in the government of Maine is at an all-time low. What has long been an uneasy peace between the state...

 

Department of Justice Sides With Natives, Files Lawsuit Against SD for Discrimination

On Tuesday, November 3, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against South Dakota’s Department of Social Services (DSS), alleging racial discrimination against Native American job applicants. Prompted by the complaint of a Native American man, Cedric Goodman, this lawsuit shines light on the lingering phenomena of institutional racism in the state of South Dakota....

 

Winnebago Tribe to Again Offer Stimulus Payments to Members

WINNEBAGO, Neb. (AP) -- The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska will again offer stimulus payments to enrolled members after canceling them in July because of budget constraints. Tribal officials say the $250 payments will be issued Dec. 3 at the Blackhawk Community Center. Those with outstanding loans to tribal offices or child support will forfeit the checks to help cover the debt....

 

Otoe-Missouria Tribal Council Sworn In

RED ROCK — Three Otoe-Missouria Tribal Council members took the oath of office on Thursday, Nov. 12 at the old agency in Red Rock. Vice Chairman Ted Grant, Tribal Treasurer Courtney Burgess and 3rd Member Alvin Moore all ran unopposed as incumbents. Due to this unprecedented occurrence, a tribal election was deemed unnecessary by the tribal constitution and affirmed by the...

 

Feds nab sex traffickers in South Dakota: 'Catching awful lot of them'

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — It was an anonymous two-story house with an outdoor side staircase, nothing that looked ominous to Kevin Koliner when he passed by going to and from work. On one evening stroll, the federal prosecutor heard loud noises but figured it was just a party. Later, he’d discover the ugly truth. In a squalid second-floor apartment, just blocks from the U.S....

 

Native American culture feels effects of boarding schools decades after system closed

Paul Raphael was just a kid in first grade when it happened. He attended the Holy Childhood of Jesus School in Harbor Springs — a boarding school among hundreds nationwide that operated for more than a century — where Native American children were sent to become “civilized” by nuns. The nuns were teaching table manners. One asked: What happens after you butter your...

 

Native Americans linked to Ice Age Girl DNA

A rather intriguing study has surfaced regarding a skeleton that has been found in an underwater cave in Mexico. The recent scientific study now links the DNA derived from the skull to Native Americans. A report has been posted by ScienceMag, showing details about the observations made regarding the skull and its DNA that has been found underwater in Mexico by Alberto Nava and...

 

Living on vanishing island, Native American tribe ponders future

For decades, Albert Naquin has watched the Gulf of Mexico slowly claim the land of his native Isle de Jean Charles — a finger of dirt jutting out from the coast of Terrebonne Parish. As chief of Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Indians on a diminishing island that Naquin pronounces "john shawls," he worries about protecting the remaining inhabitants of...

 

Former tribal Chairman's second trial to be pushed back

WPBN/WGTU — Former Tribal Chairman of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Derek Bailey, will not be sentenced on his recent sex crimes conviction in Leelanau County until his Grand Traverse County trial is over, where he faces additional sex charges. Circuit Court Judge Philip Rodgers went on record Friday afternoon saying he's seriously considering...

 

Sisseton-Wahpeton tribal chairman faces removal hearing Tuesday

SISSETON, S.D. – The tribal chairman of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate on the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation faces a second removal hearing Tuesday. Although surviving the last removal attempt in September, this week the tribal council voted to suspend Chairman Bruce Renville on a 6-2 vote with one member abstaining. Renville had been suspended by the tribal council a few...

 

Yakama man's 1917 illegal fishing conviction overturned

YAKIMA — Justice can come slowly. In this case it has taken nearly a century. It is the story of treaty rights, Washington state’s belated efforts to correct wrongs and an 81-year-old Yakama man who sought for years to vacate his great-uncle’s 1917 conviction for illegally fishing. George Meninock was 77 when he told a court it’s his right to fish his family’s...

 

Sex traffickers seek haven in South Dakota

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — It was an anonymous two-story house with an outdoor side staircase, nothing that looked ominous to Kevin Koliner when he passed by going to and from work. On one evening stroll, the federal prosecutor heard loud noises but figured it was just a party. Later, he'd discover the ugly truth. In a squalid second-floor apartment, blocks from the U.S. attorney's...

 

2 Manitoba men switched at birth dealing with 'stolen identity'

Luke Monias and Norman Barkman fought back tears on Friday as they spoke of trying to come to terms with the news that they were switched at birth. "It's hard. I just want to know what happened," a soft-spoken Barkman told a reporter-filled room at the Manitoba legislative building in Winnipeg. They were joined by Eric Robinson, Manitoba's aboriginal and northern affairs...

 

Across the Region: Tribe burned pot crop for fear of federal raid

A South Dakota Native American tribe that sought to open the nation’s first marijuana resort burned its crop after federal officials signaled a potential raid. According to Flandreau Santee Sioux President Anthony Reider, the move came in the wake of a meeting in Washington that included a Justice Department official and U.S. Attorney for South Dakota Randolph Seiler. Reider...

 

Tribal Pot: What's Next?

The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe is waiting for the smoke to clear before it decides whether or not to move forward with its plans for a marijuana growing operation. This past weekend, the tribe burned $2 million worth of marijuana plants after making the decision to suspend operations. But that decision has now sparked even more questions about what happens next. The...

 

Pipeline Protesters 'Invade' Enbridge's Duluth Offices, Seven Arrested

Drums, singing and a letter “invaded” the Duluth, Minnesota offices of Enbridge Inc. earlier this month, as more than 100 protesters demanded that the energy company conduct an environmental review and consult with tribes over its pipeline propositions. Fond du Lac Band of Chippewa members as well as representatives from Honor the Earth and the Minnesota Public Interest...

 

Former US Attorney backs review of domestic violence case

A former federal prosecutor is supporting the Obama administration's efforts to protect American Indian and Alaska Native women from repeat domestic violence offenders. Tim Purdon served as U.S. Attorney for North Dakota when the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals confirmed that tribal convictions can be used against men who repeatedly abuse Native women. But that July 2011 decision...

 

Trudeau tells Wilson-Raybould he wants fewer Indigenous people in prisons

OTTAWA – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has issued orders to Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould and it includes lowering the number of Indigenous people in prisons. To achieve this Trudeau has instructed Wilson-Raybould to review all changes to the criminal justice system under the former Stephen Harper government with particular attention paid to the use of restorative...

 

Sen. Jon Tester: Congress must do right for Indian Country

“Native Americans maintain vibrant cultures and traditions and hold a deeply rooted sense of community.” These words ring true and with a rare bit of bipartisanship, they were entered in the Congressional Record last week as Congress passed a Resolution declaring November “Native American Heritage Month.” As Vice-Chairman of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, I...

 

The Bad News and Good News in Indian Country: Interior Secretary Sally Jewell

Last week, the 7th Annual White House Tribal Nations Conference took place in Washington DC. The conference was created by the Obama Administration to allow tribal leaders the opportunity to meet with top government political and agency leaders to strengthen the government-to-government relationships with Indian Country and to improve the lives of American Indians and Alaska...

 

Smoking rates in Indian Country continue to top the nation

Smoking rates among American Indians and Alaska Natives continue to outpace the rest of the nation, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported. Cigarette use is on the decline in the United States. According to the CDC, 16.8 percent of Americans reported using cigarettes on a regular basis last year, down from 20.9 percent in 2005. "Cigarette smoking was...

 

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