Red Lake Nation News - Babaamaajimowinan (Telling of news in different places)

 

Opinion

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 Opinion    September 26, 2016 

Debora Juarez: Disenrollment is not sovereignty

Disenrollment is tantamount to relinquishment of my Birthright. But unlike relinquishment of parental rights, disenrollment is based on no fault of my own. Disenrollment is a decision to steal from me my own Creator-given DNA, my spark, my own gift. I understand. Because, as an Indian Mother who gave up an Indian Son, it feels eerily reminiscent of a day 39 years ago. http://lastrealindians.com/debora-juarez-disenrollment-is-not-sovereignty/...

 
 Opinion    September 20, 2016

How the Standing Rock Sioux should have been able to stop that pipeline

Quick quiz: What’s the best way to stop a company from building an oil pipeline on a piece of land you find valuable? Answer: Buy the land. After staging protests over the last several weeks, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has managed to temporarily halt the construction of the $3.7 billion Dakota Access Pipeline. The pipeline, which would carry 470,000 barrels of oil a day from North Dakota to Illinois, doesn’t actually go through the reservation land of the tribe, but tribe leaders say it’s on land that has cultural significance to...

 
 Opinion    September 20, 2016

At Camp with the Standing Rock Pipeline Protesters

I first made the 1,600-mile journey from Berkeley, California, to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in late August and again in early September to document this latest skirmish in the fight to shield fresh water from pollution, to keep fossil fuels in the ground, and to ensure greenhouse gasses stay out of the atmosphere. When I arrived, I realized there are two major stories unfolding here on the windswept prairie of North Dakota. One of them, the one that has drawn the most media attention, plays out in rallies and hashtags, Facebook Live...

 
 Opinion    September 19, 2016

Why school should start later in the day

Each fall, groggy teenagers resign themselves to another year of fighting their body clocks so they can get to class on time. It’s well known that teens who don’t get at least eight hours of sleep a night face a slew of problems. That’s why both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control recommend shifting middle- and high-school start times to 8:30 a.m. or later. Yet during the 2011-12 school year — the most recent statistics available — only 17.7 % of the nation’s public middle, high and combined...

 
 Opinion    September 16, 2016

There is something we can do to help Standing Rock

On social media and in real life we hear this often: “What can I do to help Standing Rock?” Some answer the question by donating money, many send supplies, and hundreds of people jump in their car and travel to the camps near Cannonball, North Dakota. Once there folks pray, some engage in direct action, and all of us learn more about the challenges facing humanity. There is something else that can done: Vote. Chase Iron Eyes, who is running for Congress from North Dakota, made that point on his web page this week. “I don’t believe...

 
 Opinion    September 15, 2016

Problems at Bureau of Indian Education schools highlight need for school choice

GROUPS opposing school choice programs insist most education problems can be solved simply by increasing funding at public schools, but not by allowing parents to choose the school that best fits their children's needs. The status of federally funded Bureau of Indian Education schools proves otherwise. Approximately 41,000 American Indian students attend 185 BIE schools. As U.S. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., recently noted, per-pupil funding at those schools is an estimated $15,000 per year. That's close to double Oklahoma's statewide average and...

 
 Opinion    September 12, 2016

Why Donald Trump's 'Regrets' Must Be Specific

Donald Trump wants minorities to vote for him. He’s reaching out to different races that he’s described as “living in poverty” in neighborhoods that are “more dangerous than war zones.” He repeatedly followed his assessments by implying his policies could elevate their quality of life. The presidential hopeful has even asked minorities in multiple states to vote for him based upon the question, "What do you have to lose?" Attempting to appeal to diverse voters is a strategic pivot for the unfiltered Trump who infamously labeled...

 
 Opinion    September 9, 2016

From The Dakotas to The Desert: Energy Companies Threaten Native Culture

Commentary: An energy company plans a project that would destroy land Native people hold as sacred. Despite Native protests, neither state nor federal agencies intervene to protect those cultural sites. The project proceeds. The land is forever altered. Hundreds of Native people and their supporters converge on the site to protest and to grieve their loss. Given recent news, not to mention the choice of photo at the top of this story, you could be forgiven for assuming I’m describing current events at the Standing Rock reservation in North Da...

 
 Opinion    September 6, 2016

Clinton, Democrats and Strengthening Indian Policy

If Hillary Clinton became president she would have a great opportunity to strengthen Indian policy. Her current policy statements, however, do not suggest she will introduce any significant improvements in Indian policy. If elected president, Clinton promises to support funding for improving: American Indian health, education, tribal colleges and universities, safety and justice, environmental protection, economic opportunity for youth, support for Indian veterans, combating violence against Indian women, combating drug and alcohol addictions,...

 
 Opinion    September 6, 2016

Five Ways the Government Keeps Native Americans in Poverty

Imagine if the government were responsible for looking after your best interests. All of your assets must be managed by bureaucrats on your behalf. A special bureau is even set up to oversee your affairs. Every important decision you make requires approval, and every approval comes with a mountain of regulations. How well would this work? Just ask Native Americans. The federal government is responsible for managing Indian affairs for the benefit of all Indians. But by all accounts the government has failed to live up to this responsibility. As...

 
 Opinion    September 2, 2016

Casino wealth and well-being: The tale of two tribes

You could call it “The tale of two tribes,” one a tribe of millionaires in Minnesota; the other a less-fortunate tribe in Oregon. Though wildly dissimilar in circumstances, they share a common malady: a dependency curse that tribal leaders now see as a cause of epic social problems, from alcoholism to suicides and parental dysfunction. The Mdewakanton Sioux of Minnesota are dependent not on the government, but on the wealth of a gambling enterprise that provides an unbelievable $1 million for each adult member each year, making them the...

 
 Opinion    August 30, 2016

Editorial counterpoint: What we lose if we lose the Clinton Foundation

Costa Kiggundu came to mind when I read the Star Tribune’s Aug. 28 editorial (“Shut down the Clinton Foundation”). She is a woman I interviewed in 2008 in a gritty slum of Kampala, Uganda. As I always do when people in other countries grant interviews, I began our meeting by saying: “I plan to ask you many questions, so it’s only fair for you to do the same. Is there anything you would like to ask me?” Over the years, no interviewee has turned down that offer. Do I have children? Do I like their country? What is my favorite food?...

 
 Opinion    August 30, 2016

What one man learned when his daughter was harassed on Hennepin Avenue

Earlier this summer, my daughter participated in her first professional dance intensive, a rigorous training program. It wasn’t in New York or San Francisco or anywhere fancy. It was in Minneapolis at the Cowles Center on Hennepin Avenue. She was selected as the lone high school participant, a source of pride for her. Her excitement gave her mother and me no small measure of joy, almost enough to erase the reminder that she is growing up and soon will make her way out into the world. We will see less of her. She will need less from us. Our...

 
 Opinion    August 29, 2016

Where's the diversity in media? How newsrooms fail to reflect America and why it matters

This ad in The Washington Post jumped out at me. In one tight photograph, it quickly telegraphs what’s wrong with the news media today and why the audience isn’t growing. Yes, it’s great to see young women flourishing on the campaign trail. Yes, the casual chic may appeal to some millennials. But given that our country is on its way to the long-dominant white majority becoming the minority, this photo doesn’t reflect society. If I were an African-American or Hispanic — and I’m not — I would not see myself in this photo. (OK maybe...

 
 Opinion    August 23, 2016

The most powerful tool is in the Media

Attila the Hun was a legendary military leader who spread fear and devastated lands far and wide from the Black Sea through the Mediterranean during the rule of the late Roman Empire. He was dubbed “Flagellum Dei” or “Scourge of God.” This article is not going to be about Attila, it’s going to be about the current Oglala Sioux Tribal Treasurer and her recent action to cause our Wakpamni District Council members to be removed from office. During the Oglala Sioux Tribes 2015/2016 John Steele and Tom Poor Bear administration the tribal...

 
 Opinion    August 22, 2016

The slums of Big Sky Country

My wife and I recently had the opportunity to tour a few Western states and it gave birth to a flood of stirring thoughts – it was perceptive insight that one can only reflect upon by being in the presence of such a great witness. During our trip we drove past the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation along I-90 in South Dakota, home to Oglala Lakota Native Americans since 1889. Today it consists of 3,469 square miles of land, larger than Delaware and Rhode Island combined. As we drove past I couldn’t help but notice the large trailer park that...

 
 Opinion    August 19, 2016

Is it ever OK for a white person to wear a feather headdress?

Every year, at music festivals across the country, white people come equipped with flash tats, face paint, sunscreen, bottles full of vodka water and, unfortunately in some cases, they bring a feather headdress inspired by a culture that is not their own. They may think the feather headdress goes with their "hippie festival look," but that doesn't mean it's OK to wear. In fact, for many, it's downright offensive. Many different cultures have their own version of the headdress, from areas in the Caribbean and Africa, but headdresses that are...

 
 Opinion    August 16, 2016

Are there even any Republicans in Indian Country?

A question I am often asked: Are American Indians and Alaska Natives only Democrats? Of course not. There are Native Republicans, Greens, Libertarians, and Independents. Yet the data show that the vast majority of Native Americans vote for Democrats. And run for office as Democrats. Of the active candidates on my #NativeVote16 boards there are 75 Democrats, 14 Republicans, and 4 independents (or no affiliation reported). But if you look at history, there are a lot more American Indians and Alaska Natives who have won office under the...

 
 Opinion    August 15, 2016

Our view: Cayuga Nation must resolve to end internal feud

The leadership dispute at the Cayuga Indian Nation of New York has had many noteworthy twists over the past several years, and last week certainly qualified as another. A couple of Cayuga Nation members could be seen sitting under a tent near the entrance to the Finger Lakes Drive-In with signs promoting the sale of cigarettes. They stored the tobacco products on some land behind the drive-in, accessible by a newly created access road to the west of the drive-in ticket booth. And the men behind the operation executed a real estate transaction...

 
 Opinion    August 15, 2016

Indian Health Services Can't Be Fixed Overnight

When the United States government signed treaties with Indian nations in the 1800s, it established a trust relationship to provide certain funding and services in exchange for tribal lands. But for nearly 200 years, American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) health care has been chronically underfunded. This has led to systematic challenges with disastrous results. It is time to fix this. It will take strong leadership and support from Tribes, Congress and the Administration to change the culture within the Indian Health Services (IHS) agency....

 
 Opinion    August 12, 2016

Native candidates advance in Minnesota and Wisconsin

Chilah Brown won her bid to represent the Minnesota’s Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party in this fall’s general election as a candidate for the state Senate. She defeated Bob Passons 657 to 462. Brown is a member of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe. She is challenging Republican Andrew Mathews in the general election. There are a six additional Native Americans running for the Minnesota Legislature. These candidates did not have primary opponents. Democrats Rep. Peggy Flanagan, Jerry Loud, Rep. Susan Allen, Jamie Becker-Finn, and Mary...

 
 Opinion    August 12, 2016

Tough women like Hillary Clinton deserve a chance

Even if she wins the office of President, Hillary Clinton will find that she still is bumping up against a barrier; not a glass ceiling but a barrier of greater expectations and demands than any man would have to face – on her intellect, abilities, judgement and ethics, and even her morality. She is facing that now, and has endured it for the past 24 years she has been in the national spotlight. Take for example, the Trump epithet “Lyin’ Hillary” is reviewed in a New York Times column by Nicholas Kristof, who challenges the...

 
 Opinion    August 5, 2016

How Washington Is Regulating American Indians To Death

Most Americans take property rights and law enforcement for granted. But Americans living on Indian reservations can’t do that, according to New York Post columnist Naomi Schaefer Riley. Riley is the author of “The New Trail of Tears: How Washington Is Destroying American Indians,” released by Encounter Books on July 26. In the book, she exposes how Washington’s regulation of American Indians has led to intense poverty and crime on Indian reservations. “One of the tribal legislators I spoke with actually said to me, ‘We are the...

 
 Opinion    August 5, 2016

Jim Northrup's son recalls his father's gifts of language

Jim Northrup, an Ojibwe writer, poet, and performer will be laid to rest in a traditional Anishinaabe ceremony Friday morning in his hometown of Sawyer, Minn. Northrup died of cancer on Monday at age 73. Son Matthew Northrup said a major part of his father's legacy is his lifelong effort to preserve the Ojibwe language. When his father was a child, teachers at an infamous Indian boarding school forced him to forget the indigenous tongue. "They beat the language out of him," Northrup said in an interview with Tom Crann, host of All Things...

 
 Opinion    August 1, 2016

#NATIVEVOTE16 – August is a Make or Break Month for Three Native Candidates

Pakootas: “Winning Requires a Big Effort” August begins with eight Native American candidates for the U.S. House and Senate. But that number is likely to shrink when the month comes to a close. Three candidates are on the ballot: Democrats Joe Pakootas (Colville) in Washington’s 5th Congressional District,Victoria Steele (Seneca) in Arizona’s 2nd Congressional District; and, Republican Shawn Redd (Navajo) in Arizona’s 1st Congressional District. The first of these primary elections is in Washington. Votes will be counted on Tuesday,...

 

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