Red Lake Nation News - Babaamaajimowinan (Telling of news in different places)

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 By Michael Barrett    News    January 16, 2017 

"Take Back our Community" - Opioid Overdose Prevention and Treatment Seminar held in Red Lake - P3

RED LAKE - The "Take Back our Community" - Opioid Overdose Prevention and Treatment Seminar was held at the Seven Clans Casino Event Center on Thursday, January 12, 2017. Well attended, the seminar began with breakfast at 7:30 AM, followed by registration and the Opening Ceremonies. Murphy Thomas, the Facilitator, provided introductions, followed by welcome addressed by Cynthia Gunderson, Red Lake IHS Pharmacy, Dana Lyons, Red Lake Public Safety and Salena Beasley, Red Lake Chemical Health...

 
 By Michael Barrett    News    January 16, 2017 

2017 Red Lake News Year's Celebration - P13

The 2017 Red Lake News Year's Celebration was held at the Red Lake Humanities Center on Saturday, December 31, 2016....

 
 By Michael Barrett    News    January 16, 2017 

Halloween Night in Red Lake 2016 - P59

Halloween Night in Red Lake 2016 - P59...

 
 By Michael Barrett    News    January 16, 2017 

Halloween Night in Red Lake 2016 - P60

Halloween Night in Red Lake 2016 - P60...

 

Tribal Disenrollment and Political Violence: Kenneth Hansen PhD: Witness for the Defense of The Cedarville Rancheria Murderer

Cherie Lash-Rhodes, Disenrollment, and Political Violence On February 20, 2014, Cherie Lash-Rhodes shot and killed four people, and attempted to kill two more by stabbing them with a kitchen knife when her gun jammed. The incident happened at a hearing held at the Cedarville Rancheria tribal government office, located some distance from the actual 32 acre Rancheria in Modoc County, near the California-Oregon border. The entire episode was captured on security cameras. The hearing—the first and only ever held by the tribe’s ad hoc tribal...

 

Interior Approves Craig Tribal Association's Land-into-Trust Application

WASHINGTON - Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs Lawrence S. Roberts, who leads the Office of the Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs, today announced the Department’s decision to place a 1.08-acre land parcel owned by the Craig Tribal Association, a federally recognized tribe headquartered in the City of Craig, Alaska, into federal Indian trust status. The decision is the first under the Department’s revised rule for taking tribal land into trust in Alaska. “The journey to this decision has been a long one. Today,...

 

Suspect in home invasion shot, killed by Mille Lacs deputy

VINELAND—A 20-year-old man involved in an armed home invasion and assault late Thursday night in northern Mille Lacs County was shot and killed by a responding sheriff's deputy, the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension reported Friday. According to the preliminary investigation, at 10:50 p.m. Thursday four men broke into a home on the 17000 block of Ookweman Loop in Vineland with plans to carry out a robbery. Three of the men wore masks and one carried a sawed-off shotgun. There were more than a dozen people inside of the home at the...

 

Grand Rapids man pleads guilty to theft of tree tops from Chippewa National Forest

ST. PAUL—A Grand Rapids man pleaded guilty to one count of theft of government property Friday after prosecutors say he stole thousands of black spruce tree tops from the Chippewa National Forest. According to a news release from U.S. Attorney Andrew Luger's office, Joseph Leon Edminster, 70, pleaded before a U.S. district judge in St. Paul. Edminster stole more than 2,700 of the tree tops between October 2008 and October 2014, the release said. After stealing the tops, Edminster would sell them to wholesalers for $1.50 or $2.50 each for use...

 

HUUF hosts guest speaker

BEMIDJI -- Headwaters Unitarian Universalist Fellowship will host guest speaker Michael Meuers at 10 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 15, at the Bemidji Community Food Shelf, 1260 Exchange Street SE. Drawing from his recently published book, "Road to Ponemah: The Teachings of Larry Stillday," Meuers will present “Makwa, Teacher of Courage/Bravery: The Ojibwe Seven Teaching” as taught by Larry Stillday. Meuers has worked in public relations with the Red Lake Band for 22 years, taking photos and writing stories about the band. He spearheaded Bemidji’s...

 

Authorities: Teacher high on drugs at time of fatal Mankato police encounter

MANKATO, Minn. — Investigators suspect a Twin Cities teacher was high on multiple drugs when he was fatally shot by a Mankato police officer on New Year’s Eve. A friend partying with Chase Anthony Tuseth, 33, of Chanhassen, on the night he died told a Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension agent he believed his friend had taken the drugs LSD and Ecstasy, according to search warrants filed in Blue Earth County District Court. Messages on Tuseth’s phone also reportedly suggest he had taken LSD, Ecstasy and Adderall. Suspected drugs also...

 

Maplewood man who raped teen in assault shown on Facebook gets 12 years

Lavell Hollenbeck is mentally impaired, but he also committed an egregious crime that dramatically altered the life of a young teen. Weighing those two factors made arriving at an appropriate sentence for the 21-year-old Maplewood man who raped a drunken 15-year-old girl in the fall of 2015 extraordinarily challenging, Ramsey County District Judge Joy Bartscher said before announcing her decision in court Friday. “I think there is often an expectation that we as judges have some kind of magical power to know what is right to do … (in hard...

 

The complicated cost of apologizing for residential schools

In 2007, the Canadian federal government earmarked billions of dollars to compensate former students of Indian residential schools Putting a price on "sorry" and actually calculating the cost of amends is complicated. So is being the recipient of those funds. http://www.cbc.ca/radio/outintheopen/sorry-states-1.3934035/the-complicated-cost-of-apologizing-for-residential-schools-1.3934191...

 

Five suicides in Quebec indigenous communities were avoidable: coroner's report

Five suicides that occurred in two indigenous communities in 2015 were avoidable, a Quebec coroner said Saturday in a report that compared Canada's reserve system to apartheid and suggested it was at the root of many of the communities' wider struggles. Bernard Lefrancois' report was the result of a public inquiry that was ordered in January 2016 after four women and one man died by suicide in a nine-month period. The victims ranged in age from 18 to 46 and all died between February and October of 2015 in the communities of Uashat mak...

 

Motorist liability introduced in response to pipeline protests

A bill introduced by an oil patch lawmaker would provide an exemption for the driver of a motor vehicle if they unintentionally injured or killed a pedestrian obstructing traffic on a public road or highway. “It’s shifting the burden of proof from the motor vehicle driver to the pedestrian,” said Rep. Keith Kempenich, R-Bowman, who admitted the bill is in response to the Dakota Access Pipeline protests in southern Morton County. He said a response, in the form of House Bill 1203, was needed after groups of protesters blocked or gathered...

 

A Murky Legal Mess at Standing Rock

In early September, Allisha LaBarge, a member of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation, travelled from Hibbing, Minnesota, to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, in North Dakota, where she began living in a tepee and taking part in protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline, which is meant to transport oil eleven hundred and seventy miles to Illinois. LaBarge, who is thirty-four, joined the protest camps, she said, because she believed that the pipeline, which some Native Americans call “the black snake,” would pollute the Missouri...

 

New North Dakota governor expects controversial pipeline to be built

(Reuters) - North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum, who took office last month in the height of tensions surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline, said he believed the line would eventually be built and asked opponents to clean their protest camp before spring floodwaters create a potential ecological disaster. A centrist Republican with no prior political experience, Burgum was elected in a landslide on a platform of streamlining government and improving relations across the state. Burgum built a successful software business before selling it to...

 

Navajo Nation Amber Alert & Emergency Alert Task Force Completes Milestone

WINDOW ROCK – On Jan. 9, the Navajo Nation Amber Alert and Emergency Alert Task Force under the direction of the Navajo Nation Division of Public Safety, Department of Emergency Management accomplished a huge milestone to bring the Integrated Public Alert & Warning System (IPAWS) to the Navajo Nation. This system is greatly needed to provide all citizens within the Nation information on imminent threats (natural, man-made) and amber alerts. “Mobile users will not be charged for receiving a Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) and are...

 

Lawsuit: Bureau of Indian Education not meeting students' needs

ALBUQUERQUE — A small, remote American Indian village in the scenic base of one of the most visited places on Earth is at the center of a lawsuit that seeks to dramatically reform the conditions of U.S. Bureau of Indian Education schools. The bureau failed to protect students on the Havasupai Indian Reservation in the Grand Canyon by ignoring complaints about an understaffed school, a lack of special education and a deficient curriculum, according to a complaint filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Phoenix. Havasupai Chairman Don E....

 

New evidence backs claim of secret mercury dump, ex-worker says

A former worker at the pulp and paper mill in Dryden, Ont., says he feels vindicated by new research released on Friday by the environmental group Earthroots. Kas Glowacki went public last June saying that in 1972 he helped bury more than 50 barrels of mercury in a pit near the mill, upstream from Grassy Narrows First Nation. His claims appeared to support research by leading mercury experts released in May, showing a continuing source of mercury contamination in the Wabigoon River system. http://www.cbc.ca/news/cana...

 

Here's How Obamacare Repeal Could Hurt Native Americans

A repeal of the Affordable Care Act — now in the offing in Congress — could deal a body blow to healthcare for at least 33% of all Native Americans. The federal government promised free healthcare to tribes in treaties more than a century ago. The legislation that protects and modernizes those treaty promises was rolled into the ACA when it became law in 2010. With the ACA on the chopping block, this legislation could vanish, tribal leaders say. https://www.buzzfeed.com/nidhisubbaraman/obamacare-repeal-could-slash-protec...

 

DOI transfers nearly $8M to Cobell scholarship fund

WASHINGTON – The Department of the Interior announced on Jan. 11 that an additional $7.9 million has been transferred to the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund, bringing the total amount contributed to more than $47 million. The scholarship fund – funded in part by the Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations and authorized by the Cobell Settlement – provides financial assistance through scholarships to American Indian and Alaska Native students wishing to pursue post-secondary and graduate education and training. The Cobell board of...

 

Brandon experiments exposed

Children at the Brandon Indian Residential School were test subjects of extra-sensory-perception experiments during the Second World War, states a science journal recovered from a university archive. The article, ESP Tests with American Indian Children published in the Journal of Parapsychology, is believed to be the first hard evidence science experiments were conducted on residential school children in Manitoba. It was published in 1943 by a scientist named A.A. Foster, and its existence adds to a growing body of knowledge to show science...

 

County can't afford to prosecute reservation felonies

POLSON - Lake County commissioners say the county can no longer afford to investigate and prosecute felony crimes on the Flathead Indian Reservation. Commissioners voted unanimously Wednesday in support of a resolution to ask the state to consider withdrawing from an agreement that gives counties jurisdiction over felonies on reservations. They hope the move will prompt the federal government to help cover some of the $2 million annual cost. Commissioner Dave Stipe says he thinks it would cost the federal government less to help the county...

 

Tribes release name of Fort Hall homicide victim

Officials with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes released the name of a homicide victim Thursday, two days after the woman was killed at an address on Wardance Circle on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation. According to a press release issued at about 3 p.m. Thursday, the victim was 33-year-old Lynelle Coby. According to the press release, Colin Diggie, 34, a suspect in the case, is in custody. http://idahostatejournal.com/members/tribes-release-name-of-fort-hall-homicide-victim/article_41ea4a5f-ae30-5166-a023-c0fd40a0eb67.html...

 

Derailed train was carrying hazardous materials through Umatilla Indian Reservation

A Union Pacific train that derailed Monday night on the Umatilla Indian Reservation was carrying containers of hazardous materials, though none spilled and no one was hurt, according to a railroad spokesman. UP initially reported no hazardous materials were involved in the 12-car derailment near Bingham Road, about 20 miles east of Mission. However, the company later confirmed there was adhesive inside shipping containers aboard at least one of the derailed cars. The Confederated Umatilla Journal first reported there was hazardous material on...

 

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